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Deep flows the River between Social and Business… July 25, 2012

Posted by Sanooj Kutty in Enterprise 2.0.
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3 comments

It’s been quite a while since the world has been gripped by the Social Media fever . However, as is the case with any new concept that catches the masses by their eyeballs and wallets, social media too has turned into a big Gold Rush with many following suit.  Suddenly, plenty of creative designers, copywriters, and account managers have now turned into peer-recognized and self-proclaimed social media specialists.

Yet, like every time the dust rises, it also has to settle down. When it does settle down, are we going to see despair as we did with the Dot Com bust in the 1990s? For everyone’s sake, I hope not, but, somewhere deep inside I sense a repeat of history.

Can businesses reinvigorate themselves from the inevitable social media overkill when the time comes? Yes, it can and this will be the time when they wake up to Enterprise 2.0. Coined by Andrew P. McAfee, Enterprise 2.0 is defined as “Enterprise 2.0 is the use of emergent social software platforms within companies, or between companies and their partners or customers.”

However, the future will not be just about Enterprise 2.0 platforms; this will also be a journey of how the corporate world adopts its Customer Engagement Strategies. Customer Engagement sees itself metamorphose itself over 4 key stages, namely, Initiation, Integration, Intelligence and Value Creation.

  • Initiation – being the welcoming stage for the customer
  • Integration – stepping it up to engage the customer to consume the products or services
  • Intelligence  – used to accumulate past learning and understand the customer’s engagements
  • Value Creation – to develop an ongoing relationship through knowledge gained from the previous 3 stages.

Today, we can witness a trend where Initiation and Value Creation are being actively promoted on the Social Media ecosystem through interactive products like events, games, competitions, etc. Obviously, these are conceptualized from the Intelligence gathered over time through proven methodologies. However, a weak Integration presence would result in many customers being bored of all the fun around without any real work being done.  All Play and No Work can also make Jack a dull boy.

So, what does all this mean? This means that until Social Technology evolves in such a manner that customers can execute business transactions via these platforms, they will over a period of time go the way of Newsletters and Raffle Draw tickets as just another marketing gimmick.

This evolution has been defined very eloquently by John Mancini of AIIM in this info graph published in his OccupyIT manifesto.

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Yes, Facebook has taken interaction with the customer to different experience, but it still lacks that most important activity between a customer and a provider and that is the “business transaction”. Naively portrayed below is my vision of the future and where I believe the future should move to.

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A world where one can log on to online banking, traverse to a single transaction and engage in a query or clarification with customer service.

The future is not just social and it’s not just business, but in a nutshell, it will and must be socio-business.

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Why I drifted away and then got pulled back to AIIM? February 7, 2012

Posted by Sanooj Kutty in Business Process Management, Capture, Electronic Records Management, Enterprise 2.0, Enterprise Content Management.
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8 comments

While the credit to my foray into unstructured information management; namely DMS and ERM must go to my erstwhile mentor, Mr. P Vidyasagar, I would credit my knowledge mostly to AIIM. Ever since I stepped into the world of AIIM, my knowledge in the world of ECM, ERM and BPM have only been on the increase.

However, pretty soon, after the initial thirst, I realized AIIM was more technology-oriented. With me being more into Information MANAGEMENT than information management SYSTEMS, I found myself drifting away from AIIM. If it wasn’t for my continued interactions with Bryant, I may have even left AIIM.

Then suddenly, AIIM announces a survey for a new information management certification and before I could say Rip Van Winkle, they launched the Certified Information Professional program. One glance at it and I was at once, both excited and nervous. This is what I wanted to be, yet, this is where I was not. A mirror that left me glad for reflecting my aspirations while honestly letting me know there was some journey to go.

However, the real importance of this renewed AIIM struck me when I came across Cheryl McKinnon’s blog post, “New Challenges for 2012: Putting People First” and I saw this picture:

And my expectations from AIIM were all satisfied in one look. From the early days, I have tried to stay technology and vendor agnostic right through my career. The flip side of this is that I don’t understand codes any more. I don’t pay attention to Application Servers, Content Servers, Web Servers, etc. SDLC or Scrum doesn’t matter to me. But, when you want to plan, search, capture, store, process, dispose information, my antennae go up.

I am your quintessential information manager, I repeat.

I am not your information management technologist, I emphasize.

So, what I want to offer my customers is this in their information management, exactly what they want:

And what does the AIIM CIP cover:

Yes, there are gaps I need to fill and yes; information management is not a one-man show. However, for now I am confident AIIM and its CIP is a path that can take me where I want to go.

8 Perspectives in ECM Projects That Can Make Me See Double August 25, 2009

Posted by Sanooj Kutty in Enterprise Content Management.
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Every time I am deeply immersed in an ECM project, I wind up cross-eyed.  That is because there are so many competing and often inconsistent perspectives that must be incorporated into the project.

These 8 cross-eye creating perspectives are mostly generic and are not specifically in an order of priority as I truly believe they are all equally important in their own way.

Now one could argue that all these perspectives are so closely related to each that they are not really unique. I would argue that these perspectives are like octuplets, similar and connected, and yet each with its own unique character.  So my task is to help you differentiate these octuplets and help you identify them all — e.g., the one with the black mole on the left cheek, the short-tempered one, the quiet one, etc. etc.

1.  Strategy Perspective

2.  Consulting Perspective

3.  Project Perspective

4.  Process Perspective

5.  Cultural Perspective

6.  Business Unit Perspective

7.  Systems Perspective

8.  Global Perspective

You can read the complete post here on AIIM’s Digital Landfill.

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